Justin's HIV Journal

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Justin on making private testimony public & the Impact on Social Media with HIV Activism


When Justin’s HIV Journal was on display at the Brooklyn Museum there was a discussion panel afterwards of Activist.  It allowed me to see activist from early in the HIV epidemic and present-day activist.  The one commonality that we all had in common was the camera.  We documented our lives and other people’s lives that were affect or infected with HIV.  It amazed me on how far activism has come but it also amazes me on what is coming next from the next generation.  Sometimes, I wonder will the generation after me understand what we’ve done to help in the fight against HIV.  I know that the generation before me probably thought the same thing.  Well, I say to them I was there, I listened, and I’m here now continuing your work.  The work that laid the ground for other like me to be able to do what we do.  I thank you all on this World AIDS Day

Justin B. Terry-Smith on the impact of technology and social media with activism
Excerpt: “As far as me growing up and going to college I kind of left it by the wayside but I always really had a passion for journalism in the media and so being a writer today really did help me to be able to be open about what I have. To be open about who I am. But I will say that I have two sons they are 20 and 18. And I will say that I LOVE social media... It does allow them to be open and to explore and explain their feelings to the outside world. It does allow us to be able to say, 'here's an important cause'. Here's an avenue for you to feel passionate about, go explore that." - Justin B. Terry-Smith
Justin B. Terry-Smith on making private testimony public

Excerpt: “Giving a testimony of what was going on with me was able to manifest itself and have other people say, 'well this is happening with me too'. Having people comment and send me emails about that made me want to do more and more. And broadened my horizon like my husband and I are adopting this kid and another kid. I'm still doing this and thinking of what it means to be positive. And a lot of people from the older generations would say well, we never thought that would even be a possibility.” - Justin B. Terry-Smith

Monday, November 27, 2017

Justin B Terry-Smith offers 8 ways to stay on top of your oral health if you are living with #HIV in the latest JUST*IN TIME


Persons living with HIV must take extra care of their bodies and minds. I have this saying I repeat to myself when things don’t go as well as I think they should go after a depressing doctor’s appointment. “My body wasn’t given the ability to fight off a virus constantly.” This includes one’s oral health; yes, I’m talking about your teeth and gums, people. People may not know this but there are certain things of which people living with HIV need to stay conscious and cautious.

As several oral health issues can show up with people who are living with HIV, here are eight facts that one must know about HIV and the mouth. (Remember that, with any medical condition, you should consult a physician, preferably someone who specializes in HIV medicine.)
Click here for Justin's Top 8 Dental Concerns and Solutions for Person living with HIV/AIDS or copy and paste this link
http://aumag.org/2017/11/22/justin-time-hiv-oral-health/

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Web series CL♥SER - Trailer | LGBT Web series comes to you on World AIDS Day | ENGLISH SUBTITLES



Web series CLSER - Trailer | LGBT Web series | ENGLISH SUBTITLES

CLOSER is a web series with 5 episodes (6 minutes), produced and directed by Luis Fabiano Teixeira and Tiago Cardoso and will be available on YouTube on 1st December (World AIDS Day).

Daniel (Lucas Onofre) and Antonio (Renato Almeida) love each other, but the condition of the first, who is HIV positive, puts the future of the relationship in question. Between the guys is Karina, best friend of Daniel and also friend of Antonio.

The theme is approached respectfully and straightforwardly, mixing suspense, drama, romance and a bit of comedy. And, of course, some social merchandising: protected sex, HIV test and relationship between sero-discordant couples.

Unfortunately, talking about HIV is still taboo in Brazil.

The fear of rejection and prejudice often pushes HIV-positive people into a world of silence and darkness, so we believe that talking about it is a way to shed some light on the discussion and show acceptance.

In general, our message is very simple: bring these people closer to the heart and away from prejudice, so the web series is named CLOSER.

E-mail: contatomardeideias@gmail.com

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Justin’s HIV Journal selected for inclusion in the U.S. National Library of Medicine under National Institute of Health


This week I received an e-mail.  This e-mail coincides with what one of the goals that Justin’s HIV Journal has been trying to accomplish since its existence. 

Justin’s HIV Journal is now being achieved in The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM).  This is very important in knowing that Justin’s HIV Journal has hit an important milestone and has made an impression on those that can influence public health in some way.  I’m very humbled by this honor and I really hope that when Justin’s HIV Journal has been archived that it will teach the present what may happen in the future. 

There are many people that do not understand that infectious disease such as HIV, is never the end.   HIV is but one disease, and trust and believe there will be others, that will cost many people their own lives. 

Thank you so much for all that have read and follow my blog and my YouTube Channel.  All the encouraging words far outweigh any negative comments I have received or will receive in the future.  I am proud of the progress that public health has made in the past decades.  We must all pick our battles and it’s better to look at the future positives than the past negatives.  But we must not forget and learn from those past negatives to have a better future for public health.  (See letter below)

Dear Justin,

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) has selected your website for inclusion in the Library’s web archive collections as part of its mission to collect, preserve, and make available to the public materials that provide information in medicine and public health, and document their histories.

The following URL has been selected: http://justinshivjournal.blogspot.com/

NLM’s web archive collections are important because they contribute to the historical record, capturing information that could otherwise be lost. With the growing role of the web as an influential medium, records of historic events could be considered incomplete without materials that were "born digital" and never printed on paper.
For more information about NLM’s web archive collections, please visit our website http://www.nlm.nih.gov/webcollecting/

If you have questions, comments or recommendations concerning the web archiving of your site please e-mail NLM’s Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group at nlmwebcollecting@nlm.nih.gov at your earliest convenience.
Thank you!

Redacted Name, on behalf of the NLM Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group
Redacted Name, Digital Manuscripts Program, National Library of Medicine
Redacted Address | Bethesda, MD 20894
Phone: XXX-XXX-4506 | E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxx@nih.gov


Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Staying Healthy in a Natural Disaster


In public health we know that when a natural disaster occurs it affects people living with chronic illnesses. HIV/AIDS itself is a disaster and compounding it with natural disasters like hurricanes will only hurt attempts at prevention, treatment, and livelihood. People need advice in times like these and I personally have been through a natural disaster that has affected me. There are things that people must keep in mind when dealing with a natural disaster, like the recent Hurricane Harvey, especially if they are infected with a chronic illness.

Please click here or the link below to get some pointers on how to stay health in a natural disaster

http://aumag.org/2017/10/11/justin-time-october-2017-staying-healthy-in-a-natural-disaster/

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Successful Rosacea Treatment Oracea



Rosacea My Story
5 years ago, I made a blog video on my struggles with Rosacea.  If you missed the post let me first tell you about what Rosacea is a chronic disease and skin condition.  It causes inflammation and visible strained blood vessels in a person’s face.  In my face it caused redness and small, red, pus-filled bumps.  Eye problems. About half of the people who have rosacea also experience eye dryness, irritation and swollen, reddened eyelids.  I also have eye issues.  In some people, rosacea's eye symptoms precede the skin symptoms.  Rarely, rosacea can thicken the skin on the nose, causing the nose to appear bulbous (rhinophyma). This occurs more often in men than in women.

However, evidence appears to be mounting that an overabundance of Demodex may possibly trigger an immune response in people with rosacea, or that the inflammation may be caused by certain bacteria associated with the mites.  But every person carries these mites on their face.  But people with Rosacea have more mites on their facial skin surfaces than most.  Also let me make sure I tell you that Rosacea is NOT CONTAGIOUS. 

Rosacea Triggers
Rosacea comes in outbreaks that are usually triggered by something.  Some of the triggers that cause Rosacea outbreaks are emotional stress, sun exposure, Drugs that dilate blood vessels, spicy food, hot drinks, including some blood pressure medications, hot and windy weather, exercise and alcohol consumption. 

It hurt me so much physically and definitely hurt my self-esteem (mentally and emotionally).  I would sometimes not want to go to functions because I had an outbreak.  People would point it out as if I didn’t see it, it was somewhat horrifying.  I had to turn down photoshoots because I was ashamed of what I looked like.  Let’s just say photoshop became my friend. 

Rosacea treatment that works
For 5 years I would get outbreaks.  At first, I used something called Metro Gel and it dried up my skin.  The Metro Gel was uncomfortable and wasn’t strong enough.  The second try at treatment was a topical medicine called Rosacea Treatment Gel that can be found over the counter.  This did help my Rosacea better than the Metro Gel ever did.  I was speaking with a friend of mine Debbie, and I had no idea that she suffered from Rosacea as well.  I asked how she did it because I had never seen her have an outbreak at all.  She told me about Oracea (Doxycycline) and that I should talk to my doctor about it.  So, I called my doctor asked if it would interfere with any of my HIV medication (Odefsey) and he said if should be fine.  You have to take a lot of water and decrease your exposure to the sun.  Currently, there is no cure for Rosacea BUT I haven’t had an outbreak since being on Oracea this year.  Since I started the medication and have not had any issues. 

Sometimes people living with HIV have to worry about being susceptible to more infection, illness than people who are not infected with HIV Rosacea is no exception.

Justin's HIV Journal: Panel Discussion HIV in the News & Meeting Jeanne White-Ginder (Ryan White's Mother) (Video)


I was invited to Speak on a Panel called, “HIV in the News” by Philadelphia FIGHT Community Health Centers for their End AIDS: The HIV Prevention and Outreach Summit during AIDS Education Month.  I found that it was very informative because there were different prospectives on the panel.  Cherri Gregg who is a reporter for KYW Newsradio and Christopher “Flood The Drummer” Norris CEO of Techbook Online were also on the panel.  and from Philadelphia FIGHT the moderator was good friend and colleague, Chip Lewis.  There were several questions that were fired at the panel.  Sensationalism played a big part of the conversation between the panelist.  I came from the place of making sure we as people who put news out on HIV put it out for the right reasons.  The opinion was very mixed.  Also, the story of Charlie Sheen came up and I said it was both good and bad.  With Charlie coming out (forcibly) of the HIV closet there was a spike in HIV testing.  But then as he became more vocal it became a shit storm, especially with him and his crazy doctor.  All in all, I loved the panel and we may have had different opinions on some issues we all respected each other because we know what an important role we play in the HIV realm.

I wanted to not only focus on the panel, but also check on other things that the summit had to offer.  I walked about a looked at the portion of the AIDS Quilt that they had.  It seems to not matter what part, where or when I see a portion of the quilt it touches me and sometimes I cry.  It sometimes puts my own mortality in prospective.  Sometimes it makes me wonder if I will have a panel someday.  Of course, what I would like is that there is a cure for HIV and I live long enough to not only see it but take it.  A lot of us that work in the world of HIV wouldn’t know what to do next if there a cure but until we get to 0 infections we still have a lot of work ahead of us.  Another highlight was meeting Ryan White’s mother, Jeanne White-Ginder.  I had never formally met her but I had always wanted to.  I have heard her speak on some occasions.  Every time she speaks at an event she played a video and it always touches me.  It a video of her son Ryan White and the late Michael Jackson's song, Gone to Soon.

Ryan White was the poster child for AIDS when he challenged his local school when they ban him from going to school after his diagnosis was widely known.  Important dates on White’s activism and legal battles are on June 30 Superintendent James O. Smith denies White admittance to school.  Aug. 26th First day of school. White is allowed to listen to his classes via telephone.  Oct. 2School principal upholds decision to prohibit White. Nov. 25 Indiana Department of Education rules that White must be admitted.  Dec. 17 The school board votes 7–0 to appeal the ruling.  Feb. 6 Indiana DOE again rules White can attend school, after inspection by Howard County health officers.  Feb. 13 Howard County health officer determines White is fit for school.  Feb. 19 Howard County judge refuses to issue an injunction against White. Feb. 21 White returns to school. A different judge grants a restraining order that afternoon to again bar him. Mar. 2 White's opponents hold an auction in the school gymnasium to raise money to keep White out. April 9 White's case is presented in Circuit Court. April 10 Circuit Court Judge Jack R. O'Neill dissolves restraining order. White returns to school.  July 18 Indiana Court of Appeals declines to hear any further appeals.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

7 Facts about the Gift that Keeps on Giving (HERPES)

A&U Magazine 
Just*in Time June 2017 
HIV/STI advice Column 

Okay, now there are many sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that we have to be conscious of and herpes is no exception to that rule. As most of you know I tend to put a little humor in my columns so bear with me…or not; it’s going to happen anyway. So, I’m just going to go right into to it. Here are my top 7 things about the gift that keeps on giving that you need to understand:

For the 7 facts on Herpes Click here or the link below
http://aumag.org/2017/06/21/justin-time-june-2017/

Justin's HIV Journal ranked one of the Best HIV/AIDS Blogs of the Year by Healthline!!



An HIV diagnosis changes your life. Even so, these HIV blogs can help you keep an upbeat mindset. While there’s no cure for HIV, treatment can extend your life and possibly delay the onset of AIDS. You may have ups and down, but it’s possible to live a relatively healthy life. The key is taking care of yourself and educating yourself.

Talking with your doctor, family, and friends can provide emotional support. It also helps to seek support from those who empathize with your situation, like these blogs below. 

The Body: HIV/AIDS Blog Central

The Body is a comprehensive resource for HIV. You’ll find a variety of articles about treatment, diagnosis, prevention, and living with the virus. The blog also features a variety of personal stories about healthcare issues, imprisonment, and advocacy. The Body also encourages patients to continue in their fight.
Tweet them @TheBodyDotCom

POZ
Staying up-to-date on new developments in the HIV world is a key component to managing your health. This blog offers information on upcoming HIV events, statistics, news, and trends. They also offer health management tips, like the effects of drinking alcohol when you have HIV.
Tweet them @pozmagazine

Justin’s HIV Journal
Justin B. Terry-Smith

Justin B. Terry-Smith isn't afraid to open up about his diagnosis of HIV. He uses his blog as a platform to educate others on the importance of safe sex with the hope of helping at least one person. His words are honest and informative. Despite his diagnosis, he's committed to celebrating life.
Tweet him @JustinBSmith79

My Journey with
Kenn Chaplin received an HIV diagnosis in 1989. Despite some serious setbacks with his health, he enjoys sharing experiences related to his health, family, and personal life. His openness and positive attitude can empower and give strength to readers who are in similar situations.

Living in the Bonus Round
Steve Schalchlin received an HIV diagnosis in 1996. As a way to cope with his diagnosis, he started journaling about his health and writing healing songs. Read about his experiences rehearsing for shows, his thoughts on the current state of the political scene, and about the people and musicians who inspire him.

AIDS.gov Blog
The blog operated by AIDS.gov provides a wealth of material and resources. Whether you're searching for information on AIDS research, global news, or trending topics, it’s here. Read about an HIV program for improving long-term care for youths or make a mental note of HIV Vaccine Awareness Day and learn more about antiretroviral therapies.
Tweet them @AIDSgov

I’m Still Josh
Josh Robbins received an HIV diagnosis in 2012. Although receiving a diagnosis can be upsetting, his optimism is contagious. He doesn't think of HIV as a death sentence, nor does he allow the disease to define him. Josh encourages other people living with HIV to live in the moment. His blog features HIV news stories and words of encouragement to uplift readers.
Tweet him @imstilljosh

My Fabulous Disease
Mark S. King has lived with HIV since 1985. After receiving his diagnosis, he became an advocate for others living with HIV. His blog is a tool for bringing awareness and inspiring others. In recent posts, Mark highlights the top HIV advocates to watch in 2017 and brings attention to a film unmasking the fear behind HIV criminalization.
Tweet him @MyFabDisease

NEJM Journal Watch
Dr. Paul E. Sax is the clinical director of the HIV Program and Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He has a strong interest in HIV research. His blog offers a series of informative posts related to treatment, management, and clinical trials. He shares the latest HIV research and news stories as well as experiences from his personal life.

More Than HIV
Brian Ledford acknowledges how receiving his diagnosis in 2010 changed his life. He started blogging to share his story and experiences and motivates others to live life. His posts reveal his personal struggles and give attention to others living with the virus.
Tweet him @MoreThanHIV

HIV/AIDS Advice by Verywell
This blog is an excellent resource for finding satisfying answers to questions about symptoms, treatments, and associated conditions. You'll find interesting articles like what to do if you have HIV and diarrhea as well as information on eye problems associated with HIV.

A Girl Like Me
If you're a woman living with HIV, this blog by The Well Project is a wonderful resource. Read personal stories of other people living with the same questions, challenges, and daily experiences, from healthcare issues to dealing with uninformed comments. Share your story and find inspiration and motivation from the multitude of perspectives represented here.
Tweet them @thewellproject

HIV Negative Spouses
HIV can affect an entire family, even if only one person actually lives with the virus. This blog puts the spotlight on HIV-negative people who have HIV-positive partners. Read about their low points or check out their experiences with PrEP, an anti-HIV medication.

HIV and Hepatitis
This blog covers a host of topics pertaining to HIV and AIDS. Here, you’ll find information on the latest developments in research, treatment, and management, as well as advice on common concerns among people affected by HIV, such as using PrEP.
Tweet them @HIVandHepatitis

Positive Lite
This blog was founded by Brian Finch, who’s been HIV-positive for over 25 years. As an informational source for issues and topics related to the virus, the blog offers a wealth of lifestyle pieces, news stories, health advice, and general tips for living with HIV. It’s an excellent place to increase your knowledge and receive support.
Tweet them @PositiveLiteCom

BETA Blog
This blog is dedicated to providing education and helping readers gain a better understanding of HIV treatment and management. Read HIV-related articles written by individuals knowledgeable in the field. The blog’s contributors include researchers, advocates, and health professionals.

NAM aidsmap
Knowledge is crucial for those living with HIV. This blog has no short supply of educational material and news stories, like one article on how people with HIV can have impaired respiratory health even when viral load is undetectable. Learn about HIV basics like symptoms and life expectancy or take advantage of their resources that include fact sheets, apps, and booklets.

Tweet them @aidsmap_news

Justin B Terry-Smith Ranked #3 on STD Test Express' list for the Top 8 Online Resources for Men's Sexual Health

To go to the article click here or the link below

https://www.stdtestexpress.com/blog/top-8-online-resources-mens-sexual-health-3-justin-b-terry-smith/

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